Two hundred years ago, Mary Shelley’s trailblazing Frankenstein was published, a book that broke boundaries for intersecting science, psychology, and horror. Just 18 when she started writing the story, and 20 upon completion, Shelley was a young adult herself when she imagined the outcast, lonely creature—a YA trope in and of itself. Since then, Frankenstein’s monster has crossed over to appeal to children and adults of all ages, and the literature inspired by this novel continues to excite readers young and old. In this roundup, we gather a selection of books for young readers being published in this bicentennial year of the novel.

Mary’s Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein

This richly illustrated YA biography of Shelley doesn’t shy away from some of the darker themes of the author’s life. The book is written in free verse and features black-and-white watercolors.

Does Frankenstein Get Hungry?

Two hundred years ago, Mary Shelley’s trailblazing Frankenstein was published, a book that broke boundaries for intersecting science, psychology, and horror. Just 18 when she started writing the story, and 20 upon completion, Shelley was a young adult herself when she imagined the outcast, lonely creature—a YA trope in and of itself. Since then, Frankenstein’s monster has crossed over to appeal to children and adults of all ages, and the literature inspired by this novel continues to inspire and excite readers young and old. In this roundup, we gather a selection of books for young readers being published in this bicentennial year of the novel.

Mary Shelley: The Strange True Tale of Frankenstein’s Creator

In this nonfiction book by the author Victoria, Shelley’s life is explored with plenty of research and illustrations from the author’s life and times.

A Valentine for Frankenstein

In this picture book, an outcast Frankenstein seeks a friend for a Valentine’s Day party—which proves difficult given how out of place he seems in the holiday—until he meets another monster.